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Librarian Design Share

inspiration for library creatives

So Many Buttons

Every once in a while something comes into your life and changes it forever. For my colleagues and I, that something was this 1″ button maker kit from American Button Making Machines. It’s been in action all year and there are no signs of our button-making obsession stopping anytime soon.

Set 1: Buttons for Library School Students

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My colleagues were about to staff a table at the University of Maryland’s iSchool internship fair and I thought it might be nice create buttons as a way to lure in potential interns.

The amazing Char Booth created a 1″ button template and made it (along with several button designs) freely accessible via the Claremont Colleges Library Button Maker Instructions Libguide.

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Using this template as a base, I designed all buttons in Adobe Illustrator. The colors are from Pantone’s Spring 2016 color palette, and the fonts used are: Capture it 2DowncomeLeague GothicOstrich SansFuturaShortcutNexa Rust (variations: Slab, Extras, Sans Block, Script), KnewaveChunk FiveBlackoutIntro Rust.

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I tried to create buttons I thought would appeal to future librarians and fellow LIS nerds.

Set 2: New Student Buttons

button-varietyEach summer our incoming first year students visit campus for New Seahawk Day. It’s the usual register for classes, tour campus, and be bombarded with too information event most schools hold for new students. In the afternoon all students cycle through a resource fair, and you know the Library had a table at this event. In addition to info cards for new students (which will be featured in a post soon!), my colleague, Amanda VerMeulen and I created, you guessed it MOAR BUTTONS!!!!!

We tried to create buttons first years could wear to show off their St. Mary’s pride and their love for the library.

Amanda created that adorable book cart icon and had the brilliant idea to create a button that matched our “Date Due” book stickers highlighting the first day of classes. So cute! She also developed a wonderfully inclusive “I belong” button that I want to wear every day.

 

 

Given our proximity to the St. Mary’s River and our students’ insane love of all water sports, I thought creating a sailboat-esque library button might be fun, too. Then of course there’s the usual suspect: I Love My Library in different fonts, styles, and colors.

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Set 3: Buttons to Highlight New Student Common Reading

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Amanda is very involved in our upcoming new student orientation week planning, which will include opportunities for students to read and discuss poetry by Lucille Clifton, who was a distinguished professor of humanities at St. Mary’s. To highlight their upcoming common reading and the library’s involvement in orientation, Amanda created these beautiful buttons featuring lines from some of her favorite Lucille Clifton poems.

Templates

All buttons were created using Adobe Illustrator and all original files are all available for you to download and edit via the Librarian Design Share Google Drive. That said, Amanda created a very useful 1″ button template that clearly demarcates the button face and bleed edges. It’s been a life-saver for me, and I hope it helps you as well. There are also some nice non-branded versions of our new student buttons available too.

Have you created buttons for your library community you’d like to share with others? If so, we’d love to feature them on Librarian Design Share!

Publicizing Social Media Accounts

Follow the Michigan Tech Archives on Social Media - bookmark side twoLike so many libraries and archives, the Michigan Technological University Archives was trying to publicize their Twitter account to their campus community. Their solution? A web advertisement on the library homepage and a great bookmark. Sawyer Newman, Communications and Research Assistant at Michigan Tech’s J. Robert Van Pelt and John & Ruanne Opie Library, created the bookmark to publicize the Archive’s new Twitter account and remind patrons of their other social media accounts.

Side one of the bookmark (above) is also a digital slide within the library and on the library’s homepage. Side two (left) includes all of the Archive’s social media accounts for the community to follow.

You can find the PDF version of this bookmark along with the original Photoshop and Illustrator files on the Librarian Design Share Google Drive.

Quick Fixes

Dan Vinson, the Coordinator of User Services and Library Assessment at Haggerty Library & Learning Commons at Mount Mary University, is an expert at making clear, concise tools to help simplify library business to students.  If there is any doubt to that statement, be sure to check out his Dewey signs that he submitted to Librarian Design Share about a year ago, which he created with Easel.ly.  Dan’s most recent designs, however, make use of every librarian’s new fave: Canva.

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Dan created these latest designs, which he plans to link to from the library’s homepage, in direct response to his latest user survey. He explains more below.

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We conduct a user survey every semester on rotating topics, and afterwards, we try to make “quick fixes” which we can then market. In our Spring survey, multiple students mentioned how difficult it was to figure out what tools to use when, and how to distinguish our request options.

In addition to retooling our library instruction marketing to faculty, I created this handout series from a Canva presentation template, each of which we will link directly to from our home page. I feel like they condense and organize the different points pretty well.

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Not only is it an awesome idea to respond to the issues students are having, it’s so great to do it so beautifully, but also so plainly.  I know you’re going to want to modify these for your own libraries, so you can find PDFs of Dan’s “quick fix” web designs on the Librarian Design Share Google Drive.  You can also check out Dan’s prolific collection of library-related Canva designs here.  And, if you have any specific design questions, drop Dan a line.

Social Media Organization

Today’s post is a slight departure from our design focus, but given the significant overlap between the folks who read Librarian Design Share and the people responsible for their library’s social media accounts, it’s still highly appropriate! Ashley Chassé, Access Services Lending Technology Associate at the Boston College O’Neill Library was kind enough to share the content calendar she uses to manage social media postings with Librarian Design Share readers, known as The Super Awesome Social Media Content Calendar.

Continue reading “Social Media Organization”

The More Frames, The Better

Cindi Tysick, Head of Educational Services in the Research, Education and Outreach Unit of the University Libraries at the University at Buffalo used Canva to create posters to visually represent each of the frames of ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.

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Cindi reveals her sneaky trick to teach the Framework and explains why you’ll find seven, rather than six, posters in her library:

By putting these posters around your library you can begin cementing the concepts into subconscious of students and faculty.  The posters can also be printed into a brochure format, which can be given to students and faculty during orientations, workshops, or library instruction.

When looking over the posters you’ll see that there is a seventh frame, “Information has Structure.”  Our Educational Services Team at the University at Buffalo Libraries felt that there were so many knowledge practices under “Searching as Strategic Exploration,” that maybe there were actually two frames hidden there.  After debating about it we thought that students needed to know that the strategy they employed should be based on the knowledge that the information sources they were exploring had a structure (i.e. controlled vocabulary, thesaurus, browsability, etc.) so we created the seventh frame.

We are finding that this simple way to define the frames are aiding us in the development of learning objectives and lesson plans.

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The Framework is always a hot topic, and these posters, with their eye-catching colors, images, and icons, certainly help visualize and conceptualize something that can be confusing to faculty, student, and even librarians. You can download all seven PDF posters from the Librarian Design Share Google Drive, and you can contact Cindi with any design-related questions.

 

A One Button Studio How-To

Penn State University has created an game-changing resource for educators and students interested in creating high-quality videos: One Button Studio. This studio room + tech app set-up has been replicated at several colleges, universities, and libraries, including the University of Notre Dame’s Hesburgh Library. Today’s post features One Button Studio instructional handouts/flyers by Randal Sean Harrison, Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Hesburgh Library. Created using Adobe Illustrator, Randal’s flyer design and accompanying LibGuide are extremely helpful to libraries and institutions building or contemplating a One Button Studio installation.

Continue reading “A One Button Studio How-To”

Sharing Your Research

With the ALA Annual Conference wrapping up, there are likely several librarians and library school students breathing a sigh of relief after completing a successful presentation. Super proud of your poster? Feeling like your presentation slides were on point? April and I would like to encourage you to submit your poster / slide deck designs for an ALA Conference feature post.

In the mean time, today’s post is a poster from a different conference: The Maryland-Delaware Library Association Conference in beautiful Ocean City, MD. Jenise Overmier, Instruction Librarian at American University in Washington, DC, created a great poster using a combination of Canva and Google Slides. Here’s Jenise in her own words:

Continue reading “Sharing Your Research”

Library Data

These days, most universities are moving towards learning management systems and libraries are moving towards online resources.  However, we often overlook the fact that many students don’t have a reliable internet connection at home. Librarians at the San Juan College Library recognized this major issue and took action. Librarian Kim Lowe explains:

Continue reading “Library Data”

Altmetrics and Chill

University of Maine Social Sciences and Humanities Librarian Jen Bonnet recently submitted designs that she and her colleagues at the Raymond H. Fogler Library created to introduce faculty and grad students to the idea of altmetrics, or non-traditional metrics usually measured by downloads, social media mentions, saves, and citations. Jen explains:

Continue reading “Altmetrics and Chill”

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