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Instructional Materials

Learn the Terms

When Gail Schaub, Cara Cadena, Patricia Bravender, and Christopher Kierkus, surveyed 750 students at Grand Valley State University, one thing was clear: the language of information literacy can be complex and confusing. To combat misunderstandings, Gail began a collaboration with graphic arts professor Vinicius Lima where students would create visual representations and definitions of frequently used information literacy and library terms. The resulting campaign–Learn the Terms–resulted in some beautiful work by student artists, Stephen Dobrzynski, Jacob Luettke, Micah Martin, Carissa Storms. You can read more about this amazing collaboration and view all of the resulting artwork via the Grand Valley State University’s Open Teaching Tools.

Here’s Gail describing this collaborative project:

The “Learn the Terms” campaign was the result of a study I did with colleagues. We discovered in a survey of over 750 students on campus (a representative sampling), that 50% of our students don’t know the meanings of words they hear regularly in classrooms and on syllabi, terms like scholarly, peer-review, and even journal.

 We published our findings, but I knew that  we had to let others know, and offer some kind of solution. I collaborated with Vinicius Lima, a professor of graphic arts here, and his students created these designs that we’ve since produced and are sharing in the library and beyond. The designs are in our institutional repository for sharing:http://scholarworks.gvsu.edu/oer_teaching/2/

There’s a new group of students working on designs for a new list of eight terms for creation in the coming year. It’s been an incredible experience, being part of the design thinking process with these students, and I’m so enamored by their work, I want to show everyone I possibly can.

We can’t wait to see what new designs this year’s students develop!

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A One Button Studio Update

Last summer we featured a series of instructional materials by Randal Sean Harrison, Emerging Technologies Librarian at University of Notre Dame’s Hesburgh Library on One Button Studio. If you haven’t had a chance to see them, I highly recommend checking out that original post. They are a great example of clear, concise instructions in a visual format.

Continue reading “A One Button Studio Update”

A One Button Studio How-To

Penn State University has created an game-changing resource for educators and students interested in creating high-quality videos: One Button Studio. This studio room + tech app set-up has been replicated at several colleges, universities, and libraries, including the University of Notre Dame’s Hesburgh Library. Today’s post features One Button Studio instructional handouts/flyers by Randal Sean Harrison, Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Hesburgh Library. Created using Adobe Illustrator, Randal’s flyer design and accompanying LibGuide are extremely helpful to libraries and institutions building or contemplating a One Button Studio installation.

Continue reading “A One Button Studio How-To”

A Point-and-Click Guide

Some of my least favorite teaching moments are those focused on mechanics: Click here; scroll there; point at this; type on that space. Jenica Ibarra, Reference & Instruction Librarian at St. Petersburg College-Clearwater Campus uses Canva to get around the mechanical aspects of library instruction to focus on more substantive teaching:

Continue reading “A Point-and-Click Guide”

NIH Compliance in Four Steps

In 2013, when the National Institute of Health began enforcing its Public Access Policy to withhold or delay federal grant funding if peer-reviewed publications were not submitted to PubMed Central (PMC), it caused a great stir in the world of researchers and in the academic and medical library community.

Continue reading “NIH Compliance in Four Steps”

Teaching Handouts Need Love Too

Very early in my library teaching career, I created a lot of handouts. Lots. Oodles. Bunches. Boatloads. I think it was kind of a security blanket: If I don’t teach everyone everything they could ever need to know then at least they will have this handout to guide them from now until eternity!

More often than not, my handouts ended up in the recycling bin.

Continue reading “Teaching Handouts Need Love Too”

BOOlean Operators: For the Emoji Lover In Us All

BOOlean Operators

You know we love a good boolean operator graphic here at Librarian Design Share. Whether its honey badgers or grumpy cats, we’re always happy to share a nice visual that will help us teach the oh-so-useful but deadly boring concept of boolean operators. To avoid that glazed over look students get when you start talking AND/OR/NOT, why not try an emoji?

Today’s submission comes to us from Kelly Blanchat,Electronic Resources Librarian at Queens College (CUNY), whose presentation slide decks are known to impress. Here’s Kelly’s take on the graphic above, which she created using Google Draw.

In general, I try to keep my library instruction sessions relevant to students. My personal love for emoji made it an obvious choice for this graphic, but wouldn’t it also be great to use around Halloween?
Using emojis as an example can lead into a conversation about Internet resources and techniques students already use — like social media — skills that can be then adapted for library research. A good example of such a technique is to connect the idea of hyperlinked hashtags (#) on Twitter and Facebook to subject terms in the library catalog and in databases. For example, I will show students Twitter Advanced Search, as well as a few hashtags that do and do not retrieve results. From these examples I’ll discuss need for synonyms and refining search structures in library resources. Essentially the theme is, “You already know this stuff, and can apply it to your scholarly work”.

We’re working on adding a copy of Kelly’s Google Draw file to Librarian Design Share Google Drive, so until then, send Kelly an email or a tweet for the original.

Honey Badger vs. Grumpy Cat

We live in a world of fickle and fast preferences.  Virginia Alexander, a Reference Librarian at The University of South Carolina Upstate, had previously used the honey badger meme featured here on Librarian Design Share to teach her classes Boolean logic, but recently found that her students either didn’t recognize the badger, or had tired of it. So, Virginia gave the meme an update using pictures from Creative Commons and Microsoft Publisher and Canva.com:

booleancats (1)

 

 

 

Here’s just hoping her students don’t say this next…

If Honey badger Don't Care You Think I Should? - If Honey badger Don't Care You Think I Should?  Grumpy Cat

image 

If you want to adapt Virginia’s Grumpy Cat meme to use at your own institution, contact her for the original files, or find them here in Librarian Design Share’s Google Drive.  If you do alter this meme, consider submitting to us…we can make this a recurring post!

Know Your Meme AND Boolean, too

Boolean Logic, honey badger styleInstruction librarians are no strangers to explaining Boolean operators. The trick is to never mention the words “Boolean operators” to students, lest their eyes begin to glaze over and drool begin trickling from the corners of their slightly open jaws. So we try everything we can to make it entertaining, from sit down/stand up exercises (e.g. “everyone wearing blue jeans AND glasses stay standing”) to amazingly hilarious images like the one above, created by Erica DeFrain from the Bailey/Howe Library at the University of Vermont.

I’m actually married to a graphic designer…but I think (I hope) the ugliness contributes to the humor of the whole thing. Talking about Boolean search logic can be a little challenging, especially in late-afternoon classes. I wanted to give a nod to a cultural phenomenon while also perhaps getting a laugh from those in the audience who know and love the infamous honey badger.

For the layered Pixlr file, email Erica DeFrain.

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