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Librarian Design Share

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Seasonal Signage

It’s nearly that time of the year again! School and academic librarians, your libraries are about to get a lot busier, and filled with those beginning-of-the-semester questions (Where can I get coffee? How do I print? Do you have my textbook?). For public librarians, it’s time to wave goodbye to summer programming and embrace the fall.

Whatever type of library you are in, this is the perfect season for signage. This call for submissions is focused on designs that signal change – a new beginning and the start of something good.

So whether you’re welcoming new or returning students, or just saying hello to the fall season, send us your signs! If you haven’t made any yet, don’t worry! We’ll be featuring these posts through the end of August.

Photo of the University of Massachusetts Amherst campus in the fall

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Using Piktochart for Promotional Flyers

If you’ve ever tried your hand at making an infographic, chances are you’ve run into Piktochart as an option. But what about Piktochart for flyers?

Our latest submission is from Emily Merrifield, Undergraduate Experience Librarian at California State University in Sacramento. She has this to say about her designs:

I wanted to share promotional materials I’ve created using the Piktochart site (it was easiest to combine them with pdfs but let me know if that is a problem). I subscribe to the $40/year “pro” version which includes many more templates than the free version. I have attached 3 documents with 2 flyers on each for: workshops help in the library, poetry readings in our Special Collections dept, and a stress relief table provided during finals week. All of the images were used to promote on social media, and the stress relief flyers were printed out (about 22 by 28 inches) to display near the table. Icons and pictures used were either from the Piktochart options or from Pixabay.com.

I have also used Piktochart for infographics and images that I’ve put on libguides. I’ve found that Piktochart has improved a lot since I started using it in early 2016 – and allows for using their designs or easily adapting to your own.

One thing that is stands out about Emily’s designs is the use of the library logo colors in a way that’s attention grabbing without being overstated. I’m also a big fan of the stress-inducing mess behind “Are You Stressed?” in the second flyer.two fliers for stress relief activities

research workshop promotional flyers

Emily also mentions the use of Pixabay.com, which is a fantastic resource for free images that are CC0, meaning free for commercial use & no attribution required. You can create an account for free and it even gives you the option to donate some money to the original artist if you’re so inclined.

All of Emily’s submitted flyers are available on our Google Drive. All submitted work will be published on this site under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

Signs About Sound

A couple of weeks ago we asked for submissions about sound, and you delivered! We received three sound-specific submissions, all of which take a different design approach. It’s worth noting that in spite of these differences, the first two of our featured submissions make use of the red, yellow, green color scheme to denote acceptable noise levels within the library. The last, designed for digital signage, uses large eye-catching text and simple icons to get the message across.

The first submission is from Brenda Sevigny-Killen at the Bennett D. Katz Library – University of Maine at Augusta.

Sign that reads "Silent Zone" in a library.

Brenda had this to say about her signs:

After our library greatly deaccessioned our reference materials, we opened up space for collaborative study areas with rolling whiteboards, chairs & tables, and comfort seating.  To encourage collaborative use of this new space, staff designed signs to promote the new area.  We also designed a sign for the quiet area since the multiple tables for 6 falsely encouraged noisy collaboration. There are times when we have to redirect groups to the collaborative zone so this space remains sacred for silent study. This project has been hugely successful and we now find we need much more collaborative space as more and more students find sanctity and camaraderie within the library walls.  Another happy side effect is getting to know more of our students and subtly infusing a atmosphere of support, care, and staff dedication which we hope contributes to their success.

IMG_2201

Brenda’s posters were designed in Publisher and are available in our Google Drive.

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Erin McCoy at Massasoit Community College in Brockton, Massachusetts submitted designs that she created in Canva.

I was inspired by a recent conversation on a list serve to take a look at signs for “sound expectations” – I like the one in the google drive, so I decided to riff on it in Canva for those of us without Adobes or Publisher skills.

Our library is one big room, that is square, so it’s hard to place signage and to communicate where the different zones are, so we’ll see how this goes!

 

 

Kudos to Erin for tackling the challenge of signage for the one-room library layout! You can find the complete set of Erin’s signage on the Librarian Design Share Google Drive.

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Our final submission is from Lauri Miller at the Paul & Harriett Mack Library in Bethlehem, PA. Lauri created her sign through Google Slides and used icons from one of my favorite resources, The Noun Project.

Here is my submission about sound levels in the library. I created it in Google Slides which feeds the digital sign in our lobby. The sign flips between slides, so I tried to keep it brief, understandable, and eye catching the foot traffic in and out of the library.  The cell phone icon is by Creative Stall, and the earbud icon is by Erman Tutan. Both are from nounproject.com.

cell phones on silent signage

Thanks to Brenda, Erin, and Lauri for their submissions. Remember, you can submit your own work to feature or request feedback at any time. All submitted work will be published on this site under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

In need of Submissions about Sound

Many responsibilities of library employees are opaque to our patrons, but the public has in mind that one of our day-to-day responsibilities is maintaining the library’s quiet environment.  My family makes frequent jokes about my proclivity towards shushing, which I argue is 100% false.  However, it is true that to be an environment that allows people to read, study, and research the library must maintain a certain level of muted sound.

I imagine that many of us are engaged in a balancing act of meeting patron’s varying needs for space for group work and silent study.  That’s why we are interested in the flyers, signs, and other materials that you use to communicate your library’s noise levels and environment to patrons –  the formal, informal, and funny!  Or if you have a work-in-progress that needs some feedback from other librarians, send it here too.  We’re looking forward to seeing the various ways that our community designs around this library phenomenon.

 

A New Beginning

In January we announced that we would be sunsetting Librarian Design Share. It was not a decision we took lightly, and it was one we mulled over for months. In response we heard from so many people about the ways in which Librarian Design Share had helped them. Thank you so much for reading, commenting, retweeting, and generally supporting this site.

Among these responses were folks asking if we’d consider passing along the torch to a new set of administrators who could keep Librarian Design Share going. It wasn’t something we had even thought of at that point, but the idea was exciting. Fast forward a month and a half, and this idea has turned into a reality.

We are so excited to announce that we are passing the Librarian Design Share torch to two new administrators, Naomi Gonzales and Jessica Denke. These wonderful, creative, and enthusiastic librarian-designers will be making Librarian Design Share their own. They will continue to cultivate a space where library workers can share designs and be inspired by the creativity of others. With that said, let’s get to know Naomi and Jess a bit better:

photo of jess denke

Hi!  I’m Jess, and I’m the Assessment and Outreach Librarian at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania.  I serve as the liaison to the social sciences and spend a lot of my time teaching and collaborating with faculty and students.  I’ve been very fortunate to have encouraging bosses and mentors who have allowed me to pursue design work in each of my library positions.  I’ve felt inspired and encouraged by the work featured in Librarian Design Share and by the opportunity to share my own work with this community.  I’m so excited to be able to support the design work being done in libraries, this community is awesome!  You can find me on Twitter @missjessmlis – in addition to design, I love talking about all things #critlib and #infolit.  If you send me a picture of your cats I will send one of mine in return!

photo of naomi gonzales

Hello Librarian Design Share readers! I’m the Web Management Librarian at the University of Houston-Downtown in Houston, Texas and am thrilled to be able to continue the good work of April and Veronica! Like many other librarians, I fell into design years ago mostly due the “other duties as assigned” part of my job right out of library school. I did the best I could for a couple of years before discovering Librarian Design Share and the community of other self-taught librarians. Currently, I find myself diving deeper into the design waters and have become interested in universal design and learning how usability, accessibility and design all work together. In my free time, I enjoy hiking, making cocktails, and am also an admin for Librarian Wardrobe.

So, forget all that sunsetting stuff. It’s a new day around here and Veronica and I are confident that this site will only improve with new energy behind it! Keep the love and clicks coming, along with the great designs that you are all creating. We’ll be following along, too.

Sunsetting Librarian Design Share

Hello, friends.

As difficult as this is, I want to get right to the point: At the end of this month, April and I will be sunsetting Librarian Design Share. What does that mean, you ask? It means that we will no longer be posting to the site, BUT the site will remain live, as will the Google Drive with all of the amazing designs you’ve shared with the Librarian Design Share community over the years.

April and I started this project 5 years ago. It was a true labor of love. Something we started because our day-to-day work involved a healthy dose of graphic design and visual creative work. We wanted to create a space where those of us in libraries could share our creativity, learn from one another, grow our graphic design skills, and adapt beautiful work. What followed was better than we could have ever imagined.

YOU helped us grow Librarian Design Share into a vibrant, fun, supportive community. We’ve learned from you, been wowed by your work, and amazed at how you’ve adapted designs. We are so honored to have provided a platform for the work of so many talented librarians. From the bottom of our hearts: Thank you.

Why is this the end?

Over the past few years April and I have been through some pretty big career changes. April’s now a Library Dean, and my own career focus has been much more on instruction coordination and critical information literacy. As much as library outreach and graphic design will always have a place in our hearts, our careers have taken us on a new journey. We’re excited to find out what new projects await us.

Now for the details

You may have noticed that April and I haven’t been posting to Librarian Design Share with any regularity. We sincerely apologize. Our work and personal life has taken us in so many different directions that it’s been very difficult to devote time to this meaningful project.

Over the next two weeks we will be posting designs that have already been submitted to us via gmail. We will no longer be accepting new design submissions. So keep an eye out on Twitter for the last few designs from Librarian Design Share. We hope you enjoy them.

Again, LibrarianDesignShare.org will remain live for the next year or so, as will our Google Drive repository. After that April and I will decide on the future fate of the site.

For now, we want to say, again, THANK YOU. ❤

What You Can Do With Piktochart

We’ve shared a lot of Canva designs on Librarian Design Share recently, but there are other easy-to-use graphic design sites with pre-made design elements like Piktochart that can help you create great looking posters and advertisements for your library. Kendall Hinesley, Liaison Library & Reference Coordinator at California State University Dominguez Hills, has created some wonderful marketing and outreach materials for her library’s new Co-Lab and Reference Services.

Continue reading “What You Can Do With Piktochart”

A One Button Studio Update

Last summer we featured a series of instructional materials by Randal Sean Harrison, Emerging Technologies Librarian at University of Notre Dame’s Hesburgh Library on One Button Studio. If you haven’t had a chance to see them, I highly recommend checking out that original post. They are a great example of clear, concise instructions in a visual format.

Continue reading “A One Button Studio Update”

In Search of Student Advisors

It’s the first day of classes at my college, and as stressed as I was about getting everything ready by today, I find myself much more relaxed than I thought I would be. It’s so nice to see familiar student faces on campus; the whole college just feels more alive. It’s a nice reminder of why we do what we do.

As we start off a new school year, April and I would love to see what you’ve been working on. Whether it’s new signage, a new marketing campaign, or, in the case of today’s post, a new flyer to try to recruit students for a library advisory board. Jess Burkhardt, Public Services Librarian at DeSales University’s Trexler Library created today’s featured design. Here’s what she had to say about it:

Continue reading “In Search of Student Advisors”

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