Search

Librarian Design Share

inspiration for library creatives

Category

Uncategorized

Happy 142nd Birthday!

Sometimes things get too serious in the library, and summer is just the time to lighten it up and reconnect with patrons.  To accomplish this, we decided to throw a party, but not just any party, a 142nd birthday party for our institution’s founder…and our patrons were the guests of honor.

Continue reading “Happy 142nd Birthday!”

Advertisements

Back-to-School Designs

Welcome Back

The start of the fall semester is a crazy time for those of us who work in school or academic libraries. There are usually orientations for new undergrads, grad students and faculty; open house events for prospective students; and plenty of campus tours that highlight the awesomeness of our libraries. We know many of you out there have put together some amazing orientation materials for your libraries and we’d love to feature them. Brochures, websites, buttons, stickers–if you used them at the start of this semester, we want to see them.

Just submit your design to librariandesignshare@gmail.com and help us build an amazing collection of reusable designs.

Designs Featuring Cover Art

As I’ve written before, sometimes a book’s cover art is so eye-catching that it becomes the center-piece in a library-related design. Whether you’re promoting next week’s book club, a new addition to the collection or a speaker series, sometimes it helps to let the cover art take center stage.

Meggan Frost, Public Services Librarian at Paul Smith’s College took advantage of some great book art to create a set of posters that are eye-catching and make a statement.

Rebuilding the Foodshed poster

I made these posters using a very similar template to promote some speakers (and their books) we’ve hosted recently in the library. Sometimes you just need something easy that looks great, and this template fits the bill. Book image + publisher description + date/time/place + a judicious use of nice fonts = an eye-catching poster. I like to print posters as big as I can. These are 24”x36” and 36”x48”. Because they are meant to be printed so big, the quality of the images is very important. Google image search has a filter that will allow you to limit to the largest possible image. I like to play around with fonts, but obviously readability is a big factor for a text heavy poster. I used Junction for the text and Nevis in bold for the headings, both available for free online. I think the slightly unusual fonts draw the eye while still being perfectly legible. Of course, the bright red book covers don’t hurt either!

Three Squares poster

Meggan created these posters using Adobe InDesign. For the original files, email Meggan.

Read the Rainbow

Read the Rainbow: Literacy in Pantone SwatchesWe’ve featured a few different book displays on Librarian Design Share since our blog began, and I have to admit they’re my secret favorite thing to post. I don’t really get the opportunity to create displays for my library, so I think posting other people’s displays is my way of filling a personal design void.

This fantastic display comes to us from Leanne Mobley, MLS Candidate at Indiana University and the Center Supervisor at the Willkie Library, Indiana University Residential Programs & Services Libraries.

Read the Rainbow: Literacy in Pantone SwatchesHere’s Leanne in her own words:

For the month of April, I put together a “Read the Rainbow” display to highlight our fiction collection. The display is an homage to the classic Pantone paint swatches. I rounded up a handful of books with vibrant covers and then used the eyedropper tool in Illustrator to select the main color featured.

I also ransacked the paint swatches at our local hardware store and covered our bulletin board. We mostly circulate DVDs and music, but our patrons are really enjoying the display and seem to be taking notice of our fiction collection.

Read the Rainbow: Literacy in Pantone Swatches

April and I both love classic look of Pantone color swatches and can easily see this display replicated in academic, school, and public libraries. Really any library with a fiction collection would be able to do this!

If you have questions about the display, leave a comment. For the Illustrator files that accompany this display, contact Leanne directly.

Changing it Up a Little

April and I started this blog last December, and since then, we’ve been so impressed with the designs you’ve shared with us. In an effort to better showcase new designs and mix things up a bit, we’ve given Librarian Design Share a little face lift.

New year, new theme, new layout.

You can still search the blog for design inspiration, and all of our category, tag, and archive information are available in the site footer.

Hope y’all enjoy the changes around here.

Pop Up Herb Truck

Library displays are often planned out laboriously, but other times they happen organically (pun intended), as the case with the Pop Up Herb Truck at Northern Virginia Community College, Annandale Campus.  Librarian Paula DeRoy–you may remember her from this post–explains:

You know how it is with creativity… and gardeners…and librarians.   It all started when one of the staff offered to bring in some lavender from his garden.  We got to talking about the herbs we have flourishing right now.  So we decided to bring in herbs and why not pull some books from the collection?

The herb display is kind of symbolic of our “lifelong learning” philosophy.  We aren’t just here to teach “to the class,” we are here to promote lifelong learning and information literacy.  With herbs, we could look at the senses, aromatherapy, art, cooking, historic and medicinal uses, etc. etc.  We just keep trying to connect with our students and make them feel comfortable using the library and our services.

What are you guys doing out there with your book trucks when they aren’t full of books to shelve?

Summer is Here

Librarian Summer MemeIt’s been awfully quiet around the blog these past few weeks, and with good reason. Those of us in academic libraries are just coming out of our recovery hibernation: that period immediately following final exams where we need to decompress, drink some wine, and try to forget about the hoards of students looking for scholarly articles the day before their final paper was due. If those of you in public libraries are anything like my awesome local public library, you’re probably taking a programming break before kicking off a jam-packed summer schedule.

Now that we’ve transitioned out of the May resting period, April and I thought it would be a great time to send out another call for submissions.

The theme: SUMMER.

The designers: YOU.

The details: We want to know how you’re promoting summer programs, including summer reading, at your library. Are you creating fantastic book displays for adults, students, or children? Do you have an eye-catching print or online campaign to publicize your library’s events this summer? Are you really proud of your summer reading advertisements?

Share them with us, and we’ll share them with everyone else. We’d love to know what you’re up to this summer.

Photo credits: Top photo is Summer Fun by Ron Cogswell on Flickr. Bottom photo is 2012 Summer Reading Skit @ Millbrae Library by San Mateo County Library on Flickr.

Back from ACRL

Forgive the lack of posting on Librarian Design Share. Both April and I have been preparing for and attending the ACRL 2013 conference, leaving our design-minded readers with little to see from us in their RSS and Twitter feeds. But we’re back! Coming up this week and next: Examples of fun library display designs from community college and public libraries.

In Need of Library Display Inspiration

After reviewing our past posts, April and I realized that Librarian Design Share is seriously lacking in the book/library resource display category. As medical and academic librarians, we don’t often get the chance to create fun, interesting displays for our students and faculty, but we know that so many of you do!

Want to share your latest book display? Here’s your chance! Email us photos of your latest and greatest work, and we’ll feature your amazing display here on Librarian Design Share. We’re looking forward to seeing what you’ve designed!

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: