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Reference Collection in Need of a Boost

If your library’s reference collection is anything like ours, it’s likely:

  • underused
  • overlooked
  • full of fantastic info that makes librarians drool

My fantastic colleague, Amanda VerMeulen, recently created a series of shelf signs to try to draw attention to our in-need-of-more-than-a-little-love reference collection.

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Hello 2016

Happy New Year, everyone! 2015 has been a year of transition for April and I here at Librarian Design Share. Our jobs and responsibilities may have changed a bit in the last year, but our love of design continues, and so does Librarian Design Share. We can’t wait to see what amazing posters, displays, web designs, and other visually stunning materials you’ve been creating for your library! Over the next few months we’ll have new posts, new resources and recommendations, and a few surprises, too. We can’t wait to see where this new year takes us, and hope that your own journey is a happy one.

–Veronica

Featured image created by me, using Canva and my husband’s Lego photography (because he’s generous like that). 

Photos from Banned Books Week

Today’s post is a throwback to Banned Books Week, the only holiday (celebration? event?) librarians seem to love as much as Halloween. Leigh-Ann Thornhill, Adjunct Librarian at the Los Banos Campus Library at Merced College, put together a fun display and contest to celebrate BBW. Here’s Leigh-Ann discussing her design:

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The Power of Historical Photos

I’m always blown away by the images in my library’s archives. Photos are such powerful links to the past and often make a huge statement on their own. Today’s submission, from Kim Garzia, Circulation Assistant at Jefferson College Library, is a flyer that uses a historical photograph to make a big impact.

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Changes on the Way

It finally feels like autumn in Southern Maryland–a huge change from the summer heat–so this feels like a particularly appropriate post. When April and I started Librarian Design Share in 2012 we weren’t sure how people would respond. Like many things, it sounded like a great idea in our heads, but we wondered if other people would find it useful. Over 120 posts, thousands of visitors, and 3 years later, we like to think we’ve created a space where people working in libraries feel comfortable sharing, commenting and adapting library-related designs. We’re so thankful for your submissions, your shout-outs, and the all-around great vibes you bring to the site.

Continue reading “Changes on the Way”

Happy 142nd Birthday!

Sometimes things get too serious in the library, and summer is just the time to lighten it up and reconnect with patrons.  To accomplish this, we decided to throw a party, but not just any party, a 142nd birthday party for our institution’s founder…and our patrons were the guests of honor.

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Back-to-School Designs

Welcome Back

The start of the fall semester is a crazy time for those of us who work in school or academic libraries. There are usually orientations for new undergrads, grad students and faculty; open house events for prospective students; and plenty of campus tours that highlight the awesomeness of our libraries. We know many of you out there have put together some amazing orientation materials for your libraries and we’d love to feature them. Brochures, websites, buttons, stickers–if you used them at the start of this semester, we want to see them.

Just submit your design to librariandesignshare@gmail.com and help us build an amazing collection of reusable designs.

Designs Featuring Cover Art

As I’ve written before, sometimes a book’s cover art is so eye-catching that it becomes the center-piece in a library-related design. Whether you’re promoting next week’s book club, a new addition to the collection or a speaker series, sometimes it helps to let the cover art take center stage.

Meggan Frost, Public Services Librarian at Paul Smith’s College took advantage of some great book art to create a set of posters that are eye-catching and make a statement.

Rebuilding the Foodshed poster

I made these posters using a very similar template to promote some speakers (and their books) we’ve hosted recently in the library. Sometimes you just need something easy that looks great, and this template fits the bill. Book image + publisher description + date/time/place + a judicious use of nice fonts = an eye-catching poster. I like to print posters as big as I can. These are 24”x36” and 36”x48”. Because they are meant to be printed so big, the quality of the images is very important. Google image search has a filter that will allow you to limit to the largest possible image. I like to play around with fonts, but obviously readability is a big factor for a text heavy poster. I used Junction for the text and Nevis in bold for the headings, both available for free online. I think the slightly unusual fonts draw the eye while still being perfectly legible. Of course, the bright red book covers don’t hurt either!

Three Squares poster

Meggan created these posters using Adobe InDesign. For the original files, email Meggan.

Read the Rainbow

Read the Rainbow: Literacy in Pantone SwatchesWe’ve featured a few different book displays on Librarian Design Share since our blog began, and I have to admit they’re my secret favorite thing to post. I don’t really get the opportunity to create displays for my library, so I think posting other people’s displays is my way of filling a personal design void.

This fantastic display comes to us from Leanne Mobley, MLS Candidate at Indiana University and the Center Supervisor at the Willkie Library, Indiana University Residential Programs & Services Libraries.

Read the Rainbow: Literacy in Pantone SwatchesHere’s Leanne in her own words:

For the month of April, I put together a “Read the Rainbow” display to highlight our fiction collection. The display is an homage to the classic Pantone paint swatches. I rounded up a handful of books with vibrant covers and then used the eyedropper tool in Illustrator to select the main color featured.

I also ransacked the paint swatches at our local hardware store and covered our bulletin board. We mostly circulate DVDs and music, but our patrons are really enjoying the display and seem to be taking notice of our fiction collection.

Read the Rainbow: Literacy in Pantone Swatches

April and I both love classic look of Pantone color swatches and can easily see this display replicated in academic, school, and public libraries. Really any library with a fiction collection would be able to do this!

If you have questions about the display, leave a comment. For the Illustrator files that accompany this display, contact Leanne directly.

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