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Librarian Design Share

inspiration for library creatives

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Flyers & Advertisements

Opera Talks and Classic Design

While we always love receiving submissions that show off impressive feats of Photoshop prowess, we also appreciate the simple things in (library)life. Today’s post, featuring Gaetano Abbondanza from the Glendora Public Library in Glendora, California, is a digital flyer that employs a solid, classic design.

We host a program series titled “Opera Talks”, in which speakers from the Los Angeles Opera Speakers Bureau give presentations about the world of opera, as well as detailed information about whatever opera is currently on stage.

I designed this flyer to display on our LCD screen, which is positioned about the circulation desk. The screen runs a PowerPoint presentation of upcoming programs.

This program featured a talk about the opera “Nabucco”. I used a still shot from the production for the main photo. Since the scene is pretty dark, I used white lettering on a black background to create a seamless, blended feel. Publisher is my go-to program for creating flyers- it’s simple to learn and use, and provides a high degree of flexibility.

Flyer for Opera Talks Event

Creating flyers for digital display can be tricky; you want to  make something eye-catching but also easy enough to read before the screen changes. And oftentimes the color on the final product looks different on the big screen than it did when you made it. Gaetano’s flyer includes an intriguing image from the show it’s advertising and has all the need-to-know information in one spot. The contrast of white on black also eliminates most color distortion issues and ensures that any users with visual impairments will be able to read the sign.

This flyer was created with Microsoft Publisher and the file is available for download on our Google Drive. As always, all submitted work will be published on this site under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

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Inspiration from the Public Domain

Recently my design work has been inspired by artifacts that are in the public domain.  Though I love design, I am less inclined to try my hand at drawing or painting while at work.  Thus, the great value in images that I can use, modify, and distribute without fear of copyright restrictions!

Many of the students at Muhlenberg College are also involved in creative projects with include visual elements, so I’ve been talking to them about copyright restrictions and encouraging them to take a look at items outside traditional copyright.  I’ve also created posters utilizing Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop to encourage student understanding and use of artifacts in the public domain.

 

These posters hang outside my office and are also included in a library subject guide that I’ve made with lists of open resources that creatives can use in their own work.  The posters both exemplify the work that can be done with images in the public domain and draw the eye.  My inspiration drawn from the public domain hasn’t ended with poster and subject guide creation.  I’ve also created a zine, which (while entertaining) I won’t share here since it doesn’t fit the Librarian Design Share mission.  However, if you’re interested, you can find it on my blog.

I am happy to share these posters on the Librarian Design Share drive.  Please distribute them as you please – the joy of these resources are they they are available to all!  And, if you find inspiration from the public domain and create a design for your library, please share you work with us!

Seasonal Signage

It’s nearly that time of the year again! School and academic librarians, your libraries are about to get a lot busier, and filled with those beginning-of-the-semester questions (Where can I get coffee? How do I print? Do you have my textbook?). For public librarians, it’s time to wave goodbye to summer programming and embrace the fall.

Whatever type of library you are in, this is the perfect season for signage. This call for submissions is focused on designs that signal change – a new beginning and the start of something good.

So whether you’re welcoming new or returning students, or just saying hello to the fall season, send us your signs! If you haven’t made any yet, don’t worry! We’ll be featuring these posts through the end of August.

Photo of the University of Massachusetts Amherst campus in the fall

Using Piktochart for Promotional Flyers

If you’ve ever tried your hand at making an infographic, chances are you’ve run into Piktochart as an option. But what about Piktochart for flyers?

Our latest submission is from Emily Merrifield, Undergraduate Experience Librarian at California State University in Sacramento. She has this to say about her designs:

I wanted to share promotional materials I’ve created using the Piktochart site (it was easiest to combine them with pdfs but let me know if that is a problem). I subscribe to the $40/year “pro” version which includes many more templates than the free version. I have attached 3 documents with 2 flyers on each for: workshops help in the library, poetry readings in our Special Collections dept, and a stress relief table provided during finals week. All of the images were used to promote on social media, and the stress relief flyers were printed out (about 22 by 28 inches) to display near the table. Icons and pictures used were either from the Piktochart options or from Pixabay.com.

I have also used Piktochart for infographics and images that I’ve put on libguides. I’ve found that Piktochart has improved a lot since I started using it in early 2016 – and allows for using their designs or easily adapting to your own.

One thing that is stands out about Emily’s designs is the use of the library logo colors in a way that’s attention grabbing without being overstated. I’m also a big fan of the stress-inducing mess behind “Are You Stressed?” in the second flyer.two fliers for stress relief activities

research workshop promotional flyers

Emily also mentions the use of Pixabay.com, which is a fantastic resource for free images that are CC0, meaning free for commercial use & no attribution required. You can create an account for free and it even gives you the option to donate some money to the original artist if you’re so inclined.

All of Emily’s submitted flyers are available on our Google Drive. All submitted work will be published on this site under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

Combine Display and Flyer Design

Here is an interesting design from Rainer Rees-Mertins, who works at Lib4RI-Library for the Research Institutes within the ETH Domain: Eawag, Empa, PSI & WSL in Switzerland.

survey

Rainer created the flyer in order to get community feedback on the library’s services. The flyer contains a QR code that leads directly to a survey and survey information on the back.  Community members were encouraged to take the flyer directly from the display.  I think that this is a cool, interactive display idea!

Rainer says,

…the flyer consists in Indesign of four swatches in standard postcard format, into which the print version was then cut. We placed the four flyers next to each other so patrons could read “Survey” already from pretty far away and they could take a flyer nonetheless. However, we also used the flyer as a whole for online materials to advertise the survey.

Rainer was also intentional about the colors that they used when designing the display.

The colours in the background are an enlarged version of our logo (see back of the flyer for the logo). I try to use these colours as often as possible for designs I make, because of the recognition value. What I liked especially about the flyer was the shift in the font colour from white to black in the “U”.

Thanks to Rainer, you are able to find this design on our Google drive.  All submitted work will be published on this site under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

 

Flyers: Our Bread and Butter

April and I started our foray into graphic design for libraries designing humble flyers. We wanted to share information with our community about library events, hours, policies, and practices. Today’s post, the final Librarian Design Share post, brings us back to where it all began. Here are some lovely flyers to close out our site.

nov holiday craft.jpg
Created by Marisol Gerena from Plattekill Public Library using Microsoft Publisher
StudyPaws
Created by Christine Seliga, Library Services Specialist at Pima Community College – West Campus using Microsoft Publisher and Canva to advertise therapy dog study break.
IT'S COSMIC.jpg
Created by Christine Seliga, Library Services Specialist at Pima Community College – West Campus Library for a book display celebrating the solar eclipse. Created using Canva, Microsoft Publisher and Microsoft Paint.

What’s in a Name?

Do you have a complicated name? Do you have a common name? I bet all of us fall into one or the other category, and that’s a real issue when publishing our research over time. ORCID is here to help all of us with name issues due to marriage, preference, nationality, or maybe just because our parents thought it would be easy to name us something memorable. ORCID assigns researchers a unique identifying number that stays with them throughout their career, thus making it easier to follow the publications of Janie Ngata née Janet L. Ngata-Romero.

Medical librarians seem to be on the forefront of promoting ORCID, and Sarah Visintini, a librarian at the Berkman Library, University of Ottawa Heart Institute in Canada, made the following flyer to attract faculty and researcher attention to the service during her institution’s Research Day:

Sarah explains,

I was inspired by the University of Adelaide’s flyer design, another university’s flyer design that I can’t locate anymore, and the general promotional materials for ORCID, but thought it would be fun to add a bunch of common last names at the top in different fonts. I used Wikipedia’s “Most Common Surnames” lists for Asia, North America, South America, etc to generate the list. There were a lot to choose from so I specifically chose names that I knew were common at my institution.

I love that Sarah used the look and feel of ORCID’s brand, but personalized this flyer with names her researchers could relate to. Sarah submitted both the PDF flyer and a PowerPoint slide to our Librarian Design Share Google Drive, in case folks want to use her version or instead edit the names to better reflect their institution’s researchers.

Finally, Sarah used Google Slides to make this flyer, and if you don’t already love Google Slides, you should! Veronica and I use Google Slides almost exclusively to create our presentations, as you can collaborate across distances to make real time updates. Also, you can easily take Google Slides with you on your travels as long as you’ve got an internet connection; or, if you don’t have reliable internet, you can download the slides into PowerPoint format. It’s a beautiful thing.

Psst, interested in getting your own ORCID ID? It’s super simple, just go here.

Use the Fork

Today’s submission comes to us from Lyndey Clayborn at the Oconee County Public Library in Georgia. Using Canva, Lyndey was able to build the adorable BB8 and create a fantastic flyer for her library’s Star Wars Cooking Class.

I used the basic shapes in Canva to “build” a BB8 for our library’s Star Wars Cooking Class for teens. The great thing about BB8 is that she is simplistic and minimal in design. So she’s perfect for creating using simple shapes!

Cute, sweet, and simple: The best kind of design! As always, you can download this flyer on the Librarian Design Share Google Drive or follow Lyndey on Canva.

Are You Prepping for Finals Week?

The Spring semester is like the worst kind of ninja: It hides in the shadows and then BLAMMO, it’s 3/4 over. It may be the first week of April, but if your library is anything like ours, you might already be planning Finals Week outreach and engagement activities for your campus community. With that in mind, today we’re sharing flyers and activities from Jess Burkhardt, Public Services Librarian at the DeSales University Trexler Library. Jess created all of these designs using Adobe Illustrator for Fall 2016 finals week, and is making them available to us all via the Librarian Design Share Google Drive.

Continue reading “Are You Prepping for Finals Week?”

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