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Librarian Design Share

inspiration for library creatives

Learn the Terms

When Gail Schaub, Cara Cadena, Patricia Bravender, and Christopher Kierkus, surveyed 750 students at Grand Valley State University, one thing was clear: the language of information literacy can be complex and confusing. To combat misunderstandings, Gail began a collaboration with graphic arts professor Vinicius Lima where students would create visual representations and definitions of frequently used information literacy and library terms. The resulting campaign–Learn the Terms–resulted in some beautiful work by student artists, Stephen Dobrzynski, Jacob Luettke, Micah Martin, Carissa Storms. You can read more about this amazing collaboration and view all of the resulting artwork via the Grand Valley State University’s Open Teaching Tools.

Here’s Gail describing this collaborative project:

The “Learn the Terms” campaign was the result of a study I did with colleagues. We discovered in a survey of over 750 students on campus (a representative sampling), that 50% of our students don’t know the meanings of words they hear regularly in classrooms and on syllabi, terms like scholarly, peer-review, and even journal.

 We published our findings, but I knew that  we had to let others know, and offer some kind of solution. I collaborated with Vinicius Lima, a professor of graphic arts here, and his students created these designs that we’ve since produced and are sharing in the library and beyond. The designs are in our institutional repository for sharing:http://scholarworks.gvsu.edu/oer_teaching/2/

There’s a new group of students working on designs for a new list of eight terms for creation in the coming year. It’s been an incredible experience, being part of the design thinking process with these students, and I’m so enamored by their work, I want to show everyone I possibly can.

We can’t wait to see what new designs this year’s students develop!

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Sunsetting Librarian Design Share

Hello, friends.

As difficult as this is, I want to get right to the point: At the end of this month, April and I will be sunsetting Librarian Design Share. What does that mean, you ask? It means that we will no longer be posting to the site, BUT the site will remain live, as will the Google Drive with all of the amazing designs you’ve shared with the Librarian Design Share community over the years.

April and I started this project 5 years ago. It was a true labor of love. Something we started because our day-to-day work involved a healthy dose of graphic design and visual creative work. We wanted to create a space where those of us in libraries could share our creativity, learn from one another, grow our graphic design skills, and adapt beautiful work. What followed was better than we could have ever imagined.

YOU helped us grow Librarian Design Share into a vibrant, fun, supportive community. We’ve learned from you, been wowed by your work, and amazed at how you’ve adapted designs. We are so honored to have provided a platform for the work of so many talented librarians. From the bottom of our hearts: Thank you.

Why is this the end?

Over the past few years April and I have been through some pretty big career changes. April’s now a Library Dean, and my own career focus has been much more on instruction coordination and critical information literacy. As much as library outreach and graphic design will always have a place in our hearts, our careers have taken us on a new journey. We’re excited to find out what new projects await us.

Now for the details

You may have noticed that April and I haven’t been posting to Librarian Design Share with any regularity. We sincerely apologize. Our work and personal life has taken us in so many different directions that it’s been very difficult to devote time to this meaningful project.

Over the next two weeks we will be posting designs that have already been submitted to us via gmail. We will no longer be accepting new design submissions. So keep an eye out on Twitter for the last few designs from Librarian Design Share. We hope you enjoy them.

Again, LibrarianDesignShare.org will remain live for the next year or so, as will our Google Drive repository. After that April and I will decide on the future fate of the site.

For now, we want to say, again, THANK YOU. ❤

Love for Logos

Some of my favorite design inspiration comes from logo design. I love following logo design boards on Pinterest and discovering interesting typography, color combinations, and unique layouts. Today’s design is a great logo from Kelsey Jordan and Mandy Swygart-Hobaugh at the Georgia State University Library.

Data in the ATL is a speaker series that brings in members of the Atlanta data science community to share their experiences and demonstrate how they use data analysis to improve the city of Atlanta and create innovative models for change. This is the first time the Georgia State University Library has run this series, and we needed a logo to identify the events and help them stand out among our other workshop offerings on the library calendar. My fellow librarian Mandy Swygart-Hobaugh came up with the original idea for the type set against the Atlanta skyline, but we needed to tweak the text spacing and replace the previous skyline .jpeg image with cleaner, more detailed linework. I used Adobe Photoshop to redesign the skyline, with the help of reference images and Google Earth to find the perfect perspective of the city’s most prominent buildings.

I love the color combination of orange and aqua–it’s definitely one I’ve used in the past–and the type choice of Gill Sans MT. The words look great against the dark grey skyline.

You can find the original, adaptable Photoshop file of this logo on the Librarian Design Share Google Drive.

Bookmark Your Library

Today’s design is a great example of sharing basic, essential library information with a clean, attractive design. Erin McCoy, Reference and Instruction Librarian at Massasoit Community College, created this great bookmark in Canva.

The goal of the bookmark is to communicate the basics: where we are, our hours, and how to contact us. We send this to distance/online students, and hand it out when students come in to register their library card.

Does your library have a similar bookmark or giveaway? If so, consider submitting to us here at Librarian Design Share. We’d love to feature your work!

What’s in a Name?

Do you have a complicated name? Do you have a common name? I bet all of us fall into one or the other category, and that’s a real issue when publishing our research over time. ORCID is here to help all of us with name issues due to marriage, preference, nationality, or maybe just because our parents thought it would be easy to name us something memorable. ORCID assigns researchers a unique identifying number that stays with them throughout their career, thus making it easier to follow the publications of Janie Ngata née Janet L. Ngata-Romero.

Medical librarians seem to be on the forefront of promoting ORCID, and Sarah Visintini, a librarian at the Berkman Library, University of Ottawa Heart Institute in Canada, made the following flyer to attract faculty and researcher attention to the service during her institution’s Research Day:

Sarah explains,

I was inspired by the University of Adelaide’s flyer design, another university’s flyer design that I can’t locate anymore, and the general promotional materials for ORCID, but thought it would be fun to add a bunch of common last names at the top in different fonts. I used Wikipedia’s “Most Common Surnames” lists for Asia, North America, South America, etc to generate the list. There were a lot to choose from so I specifically chose names that I knew were common at my institution.

I love that Sarah used the look and feel of ORCID’s brand, but personalized this flyer with names her researchers could relate to. Sarah submitted both the PDF flyer and a PowerPoint slide to our Librarian Design Share Google Drive, in case folks want to use her version or instead edit the names to better reflect their institution’s researchers.

Finally, Sarah used Google Slides to make this flyer, and if you don’t already love Google Slides, you should! Veronica and I use Google Slides almost exclusively to create our presentations, as you can collaborate across distances to make real time updates. Also, you can easily take Google Slides with you on your travels as long as you’ve got an internet connection; or, if you don’t have reliable internet, you can download the slides into PowerPoint format. It’s a beautiful thing.

Psst, interested in getting your own ORCID ID? It’s super simple, just go here.

When a Floor Plan is More Than a Floor Plan

Our libraries all likely have floorplans, maps, and wayfinding signage that we hope will help people get where they need to go once they’re in our building. Some of our libraries have that information online as well. Recently I’ve been thinking a lot about how some people might need or want to familiarize themselves with a space before entering it. They might be a person with anxiety, neuro-atypical, or someone with sensory sensitivities. As the parent of a 5 year old with sensory sensitivities that feed his anxiety, I like being able to show him photos and maps of new places, or even just describing what we will encounter in a space before we get there. It has a calming effect for both of us: He has a better sense of what he’ll see and experience in a new space, and I know that he will be less scared and anxious.

Continue reading “When a Floor Plan is More Than a Floor Plan”

News Literacy for All

I’m not really here for discussions about “fake news,” but I’m all for critical information literacy, including critical news literacy, and so are a group of librarians at Washtenaw Community College’s Bailey Library. Meghan Rose, Martha Stuit, and Amy Lee presented a poster recently at the Michigan Academic Library Association’s annual conference on their recent efforts to overhaul a News Literacy Libguide and use it as a springboard for instruction.

Continue reading “News Literacy for All”

When In Doubt, Make Buttons

If you’ve been following Librarian Design Share for a while, you’ll know all about my love of buttons and button makers. We’re spreading the library love with our 1″ American Button Machine at virtually every event on campus thanks to my crafty colleague and user engagement librarian, Amanda VerMeulen, and hope to add another larger machine to library in the near future.

Today’s submission is all about sharing the button love. Bill Rooney, Circulation Assistant at the University Libraries at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia has not one but two lovely button machines that are in heavy use throughout the year. Here’s Bill talking about his designs.

Continue reading “When In Doubt, Make Buttons”

Use the Fork

Today’s submission comes to us from Lyndey Clayborn at the Oconee County Public Library in Georgia. Using Canva, Lyndey was able to build the adorable BB8 and create a fantastic flyer for her library’s Star Wars Cooking Class.

I used the basic shapes in Canva to “build” a BB8 for our library’s Star Wars Cooking Class for teens. The great thing about BB8 is that she is simplistic and minimal in design. So she’s perfect for creating using simple shapes!

Cute, sweet, and simple: The best kind of design! As always, you can download this flyer on the Librarian Design Share Google Drive or follow Lyndey on Canva.

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